1432 Easton Road, Suite 1C
Warrington, PA18976.

Call us now
(215) 491-2139

Oral Surgery

From routine cleanings and fillings to complete dental restructuring, Warrington Family Dental is equipped to handle all of your dental needs. To help you understand your options, we've included descriptions of some of our leading services on this page.

Services Overview

  • Bonding

    A smile can be dulled by stained, chipped, cracked or misaligned teeth but bonding can quickly and painlessly restore your smile's natural beauty. During the procedure a thin coating of plastic or resin is painted over the damaged teeth. The new coating strengthens your teeth and is virtually indistinguishable from natural color.

  • Cosmetic Dentistry

    There's no reason to hide behind less-than-perfect teeth. After all a clean, healthy mouth and a beautiful smile are your best assets! Our practice specializes in a wide array of cosmetic dentistry procedures including bonding, crowns and veneers. We aim to give you the dazzling results you want and deserve. We are devoted to giving you the exact look you desire, whether that requires delicate enhancement or more complex procedures. We offer a vast range of missing tooth-replacement options including crowns, bridges, removable dentures, partial dentures and implants. Here are just a few of the cosmetic dentistry procedures we offer that are designed to beautify your smile.

  • Cosmetic Fillings

    Tooth colored fillings are also referred to as composites, because they are composed of a complex composite of plastic and zirconia/silica. Tooth colored fillings are actually bonded to teeth compared to silver / amalgam fillings, which are not. Tooth colored fillings now are harder and more durable than silver / amalgam fillings. A small filling could conceivably last your lifetime and larger fillings can be expected to last many years. The factors that determine the lifespan of a particular filling include the tooth, the size of the filling relative to the tooth and how teeth are cleaned and maintained daily.

  • Crowns

    Also called caps, crowns are natural-looking covers that fit snugly over teeth to conceal cracked, badly discolored, injured, or chipped teeth. Crowns minimize physical discomfort and provide support to damaged teeth. Ultimately, crowns can improve the overall appearance of your smile while making your teeth more resistant to injury.

  • Bridges

    Sometimes a little extra work is needed to create your desired smile. If you are missing teeth, having trouble speaking or chewing or notice strain when biting, bridges may be the ideal option to help make your mouth healthy and beautiful again. Sometimes referred to as fixed partial dentures, bridges literally bridge gaps between teeth by filling them with strong, natural-looking artificial teeth. Bridges are relatively permanent and can only be removed by a dentist but are completely comfortable and proven to make teeth strong. To find out if bridges are the right option for you, please contact us today.

  • JAW/TMJ

    "TMJ" stands for TemporoMandibular Joint and "TMD" stands for TemporoMandibular Dysfunction of the jaw joint. The temporomandibular joint (TMJ) is a small joint located in front of the ear where the skull and lower jaw meet. It permits the lower jaw (mandible) to move and function.

    TMJ disorders are not uncommon and have a variety of symptoms. Patients may complain of earaches, headaches and limited ability to open their mouth. They may also complain of clicking or grating sounds in the joint and feel pain when opening and closing their mouth. What must be determined, of course is the cause.

    What Causes TMJ Disorders?

    Determining the cause of a TMJ problem is important, because it is the cause that guides the treatment.

    Arthritis is one cause of TMJ symptoms. It can result from an injury or from grinding the teeth at night. Another common cause involves displacement or dislocation of the disk that is located between the jawbone and the socket. A displaced disk may produce clicking or popping sounds, limit jaw movement and cause pain when opening and closing the mouth.

    The disk can also develop a hole or perforation, which can produce a grating sound with joint movement. There are also conditions such as trauma or rheumatoid arthritis that can cause the parts of the TMJ to fuse, preventing jaw movement altogether.

    The Role of the Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeon

    When symptoms of TMJ trouble appear, an oral and maxillofacial surgeon should be consulted. A specialist in the areas of the mouth, teeth and jaws, the oral and maxillofacial surgeon is in a good position to correctly diagnose the problem.

    Special imaging studies of the joints may be ordered and appropriate referral to other dental or medical specialists or a physical therapist may be made.

    Range of Possible Treatment

    TMJ treatment may range from conservative dental and medical care to complex surgery. Depending on the diagnosis, treatment may include short-term non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs for pain and muscle relaxation, bite plate or splint therapy and even stress management counseling.

    Generally, if non-surgical treatment is unsuccessful or if there is clear joint damage, surgery may be indicated. Surgery can involve either arthroscopy (the method identical to the orthopaedic procedures used to inspect and treat larger joints such as the knee) or repair of damaged tissue by a direct surgical approach.

    Once TMJ disorders are correctly diagnosed, appropriate treatment can be provided.

    Conservative dental:

    Treatment can vary depending on the extent and cause of your TMJ issues. In general, the best treatments are a combination of self-care techniques and professional help. Some of the most effective self-care techniques you can use include

    • Improving your posture (sitting up straight, not slouching, etc.,
    • Resting your jaw by keeping teeth apart when not in use
    • Using a mouth guard at night to prevent clenching
    • Stress management techniques
    • Doing exercises to stretch your jaw
    • Avoiding very hard and chewy foods for a while

    If these lifestyle changes alone can’t correct your condition, your doctor may prescribe anti-inflammatories, pain relievers, muscle relaxers, or other treatments. Orthodontics and jaw surgery are also options to consider when nonsurgical treatments do not effectively control your symptoms.

    Pre operative instructions:

    • You may not have anything to eat or drink (including water) for 8 hours prior to the appointment. For morning surgery, no food or liquids after midnight the night before surgery.
    • No smoking at least 12 hours before surgery. Ideally, cut down or stop smoking as soon as possible prior to the day of surgery.
    • A responsible adult must accompany the patient to the office, remain in the office during the procedure and drive the patient home.
    • Plan to rest for the remainder of the surgery day. The patient should not drive a vehicle or operate any machinery for 24 hours following the anesthesia experience.
    • Please wear loose-fitting clothing with sleeves that can be rolled up past the elbow and low-heeled shoes.
    • Contact lenses, jewelry and dentures must be removed at the time of surgery.
    • Do not wear lipstick, excessive makeup, or nail polish on the day of surgery.
    • If you have an illness such as a cold, sore throat, or stomach or bowel upset, please notify the office.
    • If you take routine oral medications, please check with your doctor prior to your surgical date for instructions.
    • The use of alcohol or recreational drugs can have an adverse effect on the anesthesia medications that we use. Please discontinue the use of such for at least 72 hours prior to your procedure.
    • If you were prescribed medications by your doctor, please closely follow the instructions for their use.

    Instructions Following TMJ Arthrocentesis

    You have just undergone temporomandibular joint arthrocentesis (washing of your joint). This handout is designed to explain your postoperative course, limitations and what to expect.

    A small bandage will be placed over your surgical site. This should remain in place for one to two days days following your surgery. A small amount of blood may be noted on the bandage. This is Normal. The bandage will be removed at your post-operative visit.

    Apply antibiotic ointment to the area two times per day. It is okay to shower and shampoo starting the next day.

    Keep head elevated especially while sleeping or resting for at least 24 hours.

    You should not experience any bleeding after removing the bandage. If you do experience bleeding, apply pressure with your thumb for ten minutes. If this fails to stop the bleeding, please call the office during business hours and emergency line after business hours

    You can expect some bruising and swelling in the surgical site. Application of ice packs (20 minutes on and 20 minutes off at a time) for the next 24 hours is recommended, with care not to harm or freeze the skin especially while it is numb.

  • Dentures - Prosthodontics

    When teeth are missing, the face loses its natural contour and fullness, resulting in a sunken and prematurely older appearance. The traditional fix for this problem is to be fitted with a partial or full set of dentures - prosthetic teeth that can be taken in and out of the mouth. Full dentures are designed to replace all of the teeth on the upper or lower arch (or both). They are designed to fit perfectly on the ridges inside the mouth, held in place by the natural suction created by the facial muscles. Partial dentures replace some of the teeth in your mouth and are held in place with attachments that grip onto existing teeth. An increasingly popular hybrid of traditional dentures involves dental implants used to secure the plates in place.

  • Custom Dentures

    Today's technology allows us to fully customize dentures to fit your mouth precisely and to exactly match the color of your existing teeth. A good fit ensures chewing comfort and added strength. If you have any questions about dentures, we can help. Please contact our office today.

  • Full Dentures

    Dentures are an excellent option for people who have lost all their teeth. Precisely designed and molded to fit one's mouth, full dentures slide over the gums and are held in place with strong cheek and mouth muscles. They allow for comfortable chewing and keep the mouth and its surrounding facial features in proper alignment.

  • Partial Dentures

    Sometimes, dentures are the best option to solve the problem of missing teeth. When properly fitted and designed, dentures which are strong, comfortable and virtually indistinguishable from natural teeth can provide extra chewing comfort, maintain facial structure and ensure added strength. Partial or removable dentures fill gaps left by missing teeth. Partial dentures are held in place with metal clasps or precision devices (tooth-colored, discreet clasps) that are attached to natural teeth. Usually made of resin or metal, partial dentures allow more comfortable and effective chewing, improve speech and prevent sagging of the cheeks and lips. To find out if partial dentures are right for you, please contact our practice today.

  • Whitening

    We are now proud to offer 1 hour in-office teeth whitening with Zoom. Many of us feel that our smiles are most striking when our teeth look especially white but unfortunately soft drinks, coffee, tea and tobacco can leave behind ugly stains. To help you restore your gleaming, bright white smile and to give you an added boost of confidence, we offer many options including both in-office and take-home whitening procedures. Please contact us today to learn more about our tooth whitening options or to find out which one is best for you.

  • Veneers

    Transform your smile with porcelain veneers

    Ever wondered how you can get that beautiful smile you've always dreamed of? White, straight and attractive teeth can now be yours with our finest quality porcelain veneers. Dental veneers are made from ultra-thin layers of porcelain. They are designed to fit over the front of your teeth just like a false nail fits over a fingernail. Veneers are a popular way of transforming an impressive number of dental defects, including:

    • Chipped teeth
    • Discolored teeth
    • Crooked teeth
    • Spaced teeth
    • Decayed teeth

    Our team of skilled dentists are committed to fixing these dental flaws and perfecting your smile with beautiful porcelain veneers in warrington family dental care.

    Benefits of Porcelain Veneers:

    A natural and healthy looking smile : Porcelain veneers are made from an almost translucent ceramic which closely resembles the natural enamel of teeth. Veneers mimic the look and structure of your natural teeth, giving you a realistic and healthy pearly white smile.

    Stain resistant : Unlike natural teeth which are prone to discoloration, porcelain veneers have impressive stain-defeating capabilities. The glossy surfaces of veneers allow for tarnishing liquids to simply slide off the veneer. You can drink tea, coffee and alcohol without these liquids penetrating and staining the tooth.

    Color match : The available color palette for porcelain veneers is varied. Colors are individually made up for each patient, so you can choose exactly the right color for your smile.

    Durable : With adequate care and a healthy lifestyle, porcelain veneers can last for up to fifteen years. Daily brushing, flossing and regular polishing can help to successfully ensure long-lasting veneers.

    Dramatic and immediate results : Unlike braces and other prolonged dental treatments, porcelain veneers are a quick and painless option. Just two visits to our practice can dramatically improve your smile.

    Increased confidence : Porcelain veneers can boost your self-confidence and give you a beautiful smile to proudly show to the world.

    How are Dental Veneers fitted?

    Initial consultation
    You will meet with our friendly and experienced dentist who will examine your teeth and carefully explain the procedure to you. You will have the chance to ask questions and the cost will be worked out as appropriate to your individual case.

    Preparation
    Your dentist will need to remove a small amount of enamel from your teeth. This allows room for the veneers to fit seamlessly into your smile. An impression of your teeth will then be made, so a ceramicist can craft your custom veneers for a perfect fit.

    Bonding
    Before the porcelain veneers are permanently bonded to your teeth, you will have the chance to ask for any necessary adjustments to the color and shape. Once you are completely happy, the veneers will be glued to your teeth using special dental adhesives.

  • Dental Implants

    Dental implant provide a lifelike, long-lasting alternative to traditional replacement teeth. A small, surgical-grade titanium post is inserted in the jawbone and functions as a replacement for the tooth root. Jawbone tissue heals tightly to the post for long-term stability. A small abutment attached atop the post secures one or more natural-looking replacement teeth.

    Dental Implants are used to:

    • Replace single teeth
    • Replace multiple teeth
    • Replace complete rows of teeth
    • Dental implants provide countless benefits over traditional tooth replacement alternatives, including a completely natural look and feel, elimination of jawbone loss and unsurpassed longevity. Implants boast a high success rate – 95 to 99% – and have the potential to last a lifetime with proper care.

    Dental Implants - Pre operative instructions

    • You may not have anything to eat or drink (including water) for 8 hours prior to the appointment. For morning surgery, no food or liquids after midnight the night before surgery.
    • No smoking at least 12 hours before surgery. Ideally, cut down or stop smoking as soon as possible prior to the day of surgery.
    • A responsible adult must accompany the patient to the office, remain in the office during the procedure and drive the patient home.
    • Plan to rest for the remainder of the surgery day. The patient should not drive a vehicle or operate any machinery for 24 hours following the anesthesia experience.
    • Please wear loose-fitting clothing with sleeves that can be rolled up past the elbow and low-heeled shoes.
    • Contact lenses, jewelry and dentures must be removed at the time of surgery.
    • Do not wear lipstick, excessive makeup or nail polish on the day of surgery.
    • If you have an illness such as a cold, sore throat or stomach or bowel upset please notify the office.
    • If you take routine oral medications, please check with your doctor prior to your surgical date for instructions.
    • The use of alcohol or recreational drugs can have an adverse effect on the anesthesia medications that we use. Please discontinue the use of such for at least 72 hours prior to your procedure.
    • If you were prescribed medications by your doctor, please closely follow the instructions for their use.

    Dental Implants - Post Opertive instructions

    The following will cover important information regarding proper post-surgical care for dental implants.

    1. Do not disturb the wound. Avoid spitting or touching the wound for a few days after surgery. There may be a metal stump slightly protruding through the gum tissue.
    2. Some bleeding or redness is normal for 24 hours. Excessive bleeding (your mouth fills up rapidly with blood) can be controlled by biting on a gauze pad placed directly on the bleeding wound for 30 minutes. If bleeding continues, please call the office oncall number for further instructions or uncontrolled bleeding report to nearest emergency room.
    3. Swelling is a normal occurrence after surgery. To minimize swelling, apply an ice bag 15 minutes on and 15 minutes off.
    4. Drink plenty of fluids. Avoid hot liquids or foods. Soft food and liquids can be consumed on the day of surgery. You may return to a normal diet as tolerated.
    5. Warm saltwater rinses can be made by mixing a ½ teaspoon of salt in a cup of warm water and should be used at least 4–5 times a day, especially after meals.
    6. Prescription rinse as directed.
    7. Brushing your teeth and the healing abutments gently with soft bristled tooth brush.
    8. Keep physical activities to a minimum for one week following surgery.
  • General Preventative Dentistry

    Regular brushing and flossing are excellent for maintenance between office visits, but a healthy mouth and beautiful smile require routine general and preventative care to stay that way. Our practice offers general care that includes regular oral examinations and cleanings. Our preventative care includes fluoride, professional breath control and periodontal (gum disease) treatments designed to help you maintain your smile's health and beauty. Keep your teeth and gums strong and healthy. Contact our office today to schedule a cleaning or consultation.

  • Restorative Dentistry

    Having a dazzling, healthy smile can make a positive difference in anyone's life it can restore not only one's youthful appearance, but also the confidence and self-esteem that come with it. We offer a full range of restorative dentistry procedures, from missing tooth replacement to endodontics. We welcome patients with high esthetic expectations. We have a solution for all restorative dental needs. Please contact our office today to schedule a consultation.

  • Invisalign

    Isn't it time to get the new smile you deserve? Hesitate no longer and book an appointment Invisalign.

    Do you want a beautiful smile without the hassle of traditional braces? Invisalign is the best way to correct your smile without all the metal.

    What is Invisalign?

    The Invisalign® orthodontic system corrects misaligned teeth by moving them into place over time using a set of clear, removable aligners. These aligners are nearly invisible when worn. Proven to be successful, Invisalign aligners are created using 3-D imaging technology. At the practice, three types of Invisalign products are available:

    Invisalign 5 Express- 1.5-Month Treatment
    Invisalign 10 Express- 2.5-Month Treatment
    Full Invisalign-6 to 18-Month Treatment

    What are the benefits of Invisalign?

    Invisalign is both practically invisible and removable. This allows patients to consume whatever they want throughout treatment. It is also easier to clean teeth because patients don’t have to deal with awkward, special equipment being in the way.

    Invisalign aligners are very comfortable. Since these aligners don’t use brackets and wires, the aggravation to the cheeks and gums doesn’t occur. Patients will also need to spend less time in the doctor’s office getting adjustments when wires and brackets aren’t used. Patients can also see an image of the end result by viewing their virtual treatment plan prior to starting the straightening.

    How does Invisalign work?

    Patients wear each set of clear aligners for about two weeks and then change it for a new set. Patients teeth will shift into place a little at a time as the aligners are changed for the next in the series until teeth have been moved to their final, correct position. Roughly once every 1-2 months, patients visit the office to ensure that the treatment is going as planned. Most patients will wear between 18 and 30 clear aligners during the full-length treatment. However, this will vary between the different plans and for each patient. Invisalign can be the best option for several types of people.

    Schedule a free initial consultation at Warrington Dental today to discuss all the options. The office has convenient hours and times available for patients and on weekends.

    We also offer special promotions of $500 off Invisalign, free teeth whitening with the purchase of Invisalign kits, Contact our office for more information!

  • Sleep Apnea

    Sleep apnea is a potentially life-threatening sleep disorder characterized by repeated pauses in breathing during sleep. Breathing pauses can last anywhere from several seconds to minutes and happen as often as 30 times or more per hour. Ongoing disrupted breathing causes an imbalance between the carbon dioxide and oxygen levels in the bloodstream, as not enough carbon dioxide is exiting and not enough oxygen is entering the body. The dentist will want to conduct tests in order to investigate, diagnose and pinpoint a suitable treatment. We can offer many different treatment options which depend largely on the exact diagnosis and the health of the patient. We may advise the patient to halt some habits that aggravate sleep apnea such as smoking, alcohol consumption and tranquilizer use.

    Sensing this imbalance, the brain sends a message to the body, telling it to wake up to restart breathing the process. People with sleep apnea will partially awake as they struggle to breathe and this is often accompanied by loud snoring or choking sensations. Because people with sleep apnea don’t always completely awake during the episodes, they are often unaware they have a sleeping disorder and it can remain undiagnosed. Surgery that sections the lower jaw and helps pull the bone holding the tongue forward slightly. This surgery has an impressive success rate and is simple for the oral surgeon to perform.

  • Sedation Dentistry

    Sedation dentistry can be a combination of several anxiety-reducing factors. Different methods of conscious sedation are available to all of Dr. Rotem’s patients. Oral medications such as Valium can be used to help a guest relax and feel more comfortable, especially during long procedures. Sedation dentistry may also involve intravenous sedation for guests who can’t or won’t have dental procedures any other way. Guests that have a very sensitive gag reflex or have difficulty getting numb with dental injections can also benefit from intravenous sedation dentistry.

  • Wisdom teeth removal:

    Impacted wisdom teeth on third molars, are the last of the adult teeth to erupt into the dental arch. Wisdom teeth usually begin to come in during the teenage years and are usually recommended for removal between the ages of 13 and 21.

    Most people's jaw bones are not large enough to accommodate their third set of molars, which can pose a number of problems that usually require removal of the wisdom teeth. These teeth are positioned in the back of the mouth behind the second molars. They have little or no utility today and like the appendix are considered vestigial organs.

    There is often not enough room in the jaw to accommodate a third set of molars, wisdom teeth often create dental problems for patients. If there is not enough room behind the second molars for the teeth to erupt, they remain trapped beneath bone and tissue or impacted. Impacted wisdom teeth and partially impacted wisdom teeth can become abscessed, infected and painful. Poorly positioned third molars can cause damage and decay in adjacent teeth. In some cases, cysts and bone destruction can occur which can cause problems for the patient and damage other teeth. Impacted wisdom teeth can cause dental crowding and orthodontic relapse in patients who have completed orthodontic treatment.

    Some of the problems that can be caused by wisdom teeth are listed below. Wisdom Tooth pain and swelling

    • Toothache
    • Headache
    • Jaw pain
    • Dental crowding
    • Infection and abscess

    Pre operative instructions:

    • You may not have anything to eat or drink (including water) for 8 hours prior to the appointment. For morning surgery, no food or liquids after midnight the night before surgery.
    • No smoking at least 12 hours before surgery. Ideally, cut down or stop smoking as soon as possible prior to the day of surgery.
    • A responsible adult must accompany the patient to the office, remain in the office during the procedure and drive the patient home.
    • Plan to rest for the remainder of the surgery day. The patient should not drive a vehicle or operate any machinery for 24 hours following the anesthesia experience.
    • Please wear loose-fitting clothing with sleeves that can be rolled up past the elbow and low-heeled shoes.
    • Contact lenses, jewelry and dentures must be removed at the time of surgery.
    • Do not wear lipstick, excessive makeup or nail polish on the day of surgery.
    • If you have an illness such as a cold, sore throat or stomach or bowel upset please notify the office.
    • If you take routine oral medications, please check with your doctor prior to your surgical date for instructions.
    • The use of alcohol or recreational drugs can have an adverse effect on the anesthesia medications that we use. Please discontinue the use of such for at least 72 hours prior to your procedure.
    • If you were prescribed medications by your doctor, please closely follow the instructions for their use.

    Post-op Instructions - Tooth Extraction

    DO NOT DISTURB THE AREA: For the next few days and especially the first 24 hours, it is very important to allow your body to form a good clot and start the natural healing process. Swishing, sucking through a straw and smoking can all dislodge the clot. Keep anything sharp from entering the wound (crunchy food, toothpicks, eating utensils). Be sure to chew on the opposite side for 24 hours.

    BLEEDING: When you leave the office you might be biting on a gauze pad to control bleeding. Keep slight pressure on this gauze for at least 30 minutes. Don't change it during this time; it needs to remain undisturbed while a clot forms in the extraction socket. After 30 minutes you may remove it. You may bite on another gauze or a tea bag for another 30 minutes if you feel it is still bleeding. Small amounts of blood in the saliva can make your saliva appear quite red. This is normal and may be noticed the rest of the day after the procedure.

    SMOKING: Smoking should be stopped following surgery. Healing and success of the surgery will be substantially reduced by the cigarette smoke chemicals in your body. Also the suction created when inhaling cigarettes can dislodge the clot. Smokers are at greater risk of developing a painful Dry Socket.

    PAIN: Some discomfort is normal after surgery. To minimize pain, Take two Tylenol, Nuprin, Advil or similar non-aspirin pain reliever every 3 to 4 hours until bedtime to maintain comfort. Take it before the anesthesia wears off. If prescription pain medication is prescribed, take it as instructed on the label. Don't exceed the dose on the label. Taking with food or milk will help reduce upset stomach. Avoid driving or operating heavy machinery when taking pain prescriptions. Do not drink alcohol while taking prescription pain medications.

    NAUSEA: This is most often caused by taking pain medications on an empty stomach. Reduce nausea by preceding each pain pill with soft food and taking the pill with a large glass of water.

    SWELLING: Applying an ice bag to the face over the operated area will minimize swelling. Apply for 15 minutes, then remove for 15 minutes. Continue this for the first day.

    NUMBNESS: The local anesthetic will cause you to be numb for several hours after you leave the office. Be very careful not to bite, chew, pinch or scratch the numb area. Sometimes the extraction causes residual numbness or tingling for six weeks or longer.

    BRUSHING: Do not brush your teeth for the first 8 hours after surgery. After this you may brush your teeth gently, but avoid the area of surgery for 3 days.

    RINSING: Avoid all rinsing or swishing for 24 hours after extraction. Rinsing can disturb the formation of a healing blood clot which is essential to proper healing. This could cause bleeding and risk of dry socket. After 24 hours you may begin gentle rinsing with a saltwater solution (1/2 teaspoon salt + 1/2 teaspoon soda + 8 ounces warm water). Avoid commercial mouthrinses.

    DIET: Eat soft foods for the first two days. Maintain a good, balanced diet. Return to normal regular meals as soon as you are able after the first two days. Drink plenty of water. Avoid alcohol for 48 hours.

    ACTIVITY: After leaving the office, rest and avoid strenuous activities for the remainder of the day. Keeping blood pressure lower will reduce bleeding and aid healing.

    ANTIBIOTICS: If you were given an antibiotic prescription, take all of them as directed until they are gone. Women: some antibiotics can reduce the effectiveness of birth control pills. Use alternate birth control methods for two months.

    SINUS: If your sinus was involved in the procedure, you should avoid blowing your nose or playing a wind musical instrument for one week. Use of decongestant medications might be recommended.

    FOLLOW-UP APPOINTMENTS: You may need to return to the office to have sutures removed or just for a brief follow-up healing check.

    Please call your dentist if you have:

    • Uncontrollable pain
    • Excessive or severe bleeding
    • Marked fever
    • Excessive warm swelling occurring a few days after the procedure
    • Reactions to medications, especially rash, itching, or breathing problems

    Following these instructions very closely will greatly help your comfort and promote uneventful healing of the area. If any of the instructions are not followed, you might have significantly more discomfort and the success of the procedure may be affected.

  • Impacted canine/ teeth

    Teeth are called impacted when they become trapped behind or beneath the gums. We can work as a team with you and your orthodontist to help clear a path for your canines to grow into position.

    When canines become impacted, it’s important to treat them as soon as possible. The longer canines stay trapped beneath the gums, the more their roots develop and fuse with the bone beneath your gums. In some cases it becomes impossible for the teeth to emerge normally. Canines are crucial for tearing food and guiding the alignment of the other adult teeth, so it’s important to have impacted canines treated as soon as possible. Luckily regular dental visits allow your doctor to track the progress of developing canines and ensure they are growing in properly.

    What causes impacted canines?

    Canine teeth are some of the most likely to become impacted. They have very long roots, which means they require a lot of space. When teeth are overcrowded, sometimes there is not enough room for canines to come in. In other cases, the baby teeth do not fall out in time for the new teeth to develop. Unusual growths can also block the growth track of the canines, making it impossible for the teeth to emerge normally.

    Preventing and Treating Impacted Canines

    Depending on the growth stage of your teeth, your oral surgeon can work with your orthodontist to develop a treatment plan for your impacted canines. The earlier a patient seeks treatment, the better their chances of the teeth erupting naturally. If there is space for the canines to grow in by age 11 or 12, they will probably be able to grow in normally. Most dental professionals recommend having a dental exam with X-rays around age 7 or 8 to determine whether braces will be necessary to make space.

    You may be referred to an oral surgeon if the baby teeth do not fall out in time for the new canines to grow in. Sometimes simply extracting the baby teeth allows the adult canines to grow in normally. If the adult canines have developed too much without erupting (around ages 13–14), they will probably never erupt on their own. In these situations, exposure and bonding is usually an effective treatment method. After the teeth are prepared with braces, your oral surgeon will expose the canines and bond a small bracket and chain onto the tooth. Your orthodontist will use this small bracket to pull your canines gently into place using your braces.

    If canines remain impacted well into adulthood, they will likely be fused with the bone beneath the gums, making it impossible for them to emerge. In cases like this, oral surgeons can usually still extract the impacted teeth and use dental implants or another tooth replacement option to restore your smile.

    Impacted Canine Treatment at Los Angeles Center for Oral & Maxillofacial Surgery

    If your child requires care for impacted teeth, you can rest assured that they are in good hands at our offices To learn more about impacted canine treatments at our practice, or to schedule a consultation, feel free to contact our office.

    Pre operative instructions:

    • You may not have anything to eat or drink (including water) for 8 hours prior to the appointment. For morning surgery, no food or liquids after midnight the night before surgery.
    • No smoking at least 12 hours before surgery. Ideally, cut down or stop smoking as soon as possible prior to the day of surgery.
    • A responsible adult must accompany the patient to the office, remain in the office during the procedure and drive the patient home.
    • Plan to rest for the remainder of the surgery day. The patient should not drive a vehicle or operate any machinery for 24 hours following the anesthesia experience.
    • Please wear loose-fitting clothing with sleeves that can be rolled up past the elbow and low-heeled shoes.
    • Contact lenses, jewelry and dentures must be removed at the time of surgery.
    • Do not wear lipstick, excessive makeup or nail polish on the day of surgery.
    • If you have an illness such as a cold, sore throat or stomach or bowel upset. Please notify the office.
    • If you take routine oral medications, please check with your doctor prior to your surgical date for instructions.
    • The use of alcohol or recreational drugs can have an adverse effect on the anesthesia medications that we use. Please discontinue the use of such for at least 72 hours prior to your procedure.
    • If you were prescribed medications by your doctor, please closely follow the instructions for their use.

    Post-op Instructions:

    DO NOT DISTURB THE AREA: For the next few days and especially the first 24 hours, it is very important to allow your body to form a good clot and start the natural healing process. Swishing, sucking through a straw and smoking can all dislodge the clot. Keep anything sharp from entering the wound (crunchy food, toothpicks, eating utensils). Be sure to chew on the opposite side for 24 hours.

    BLEEDING: When you leave the office, you might be biting on a gauze pad to control bleeding. Keep slight pressure on this gauze for at least 30 minutes. Don't change it during this time; it needs to remain undisturbed while a clot forms in the extraction socket. After 30 minutes you may remove it. You may bite on another gauze or a tea bag for another 30 minutes if you feel it is still bleeding. Small amounts of blood in the saliva can make your saliva appear quite red. This is normal and may be noticed the rest of the day after the procedure.

    SMOKING: Smoking should be stopped following surgery. Healing and success of the surgery will be substantially reduced by the cigarette smoke chemicals in your body. Also the suction created when inhaling cigarettes can dislodge the clot. Smokers are at greater risk of developing a painful Dry Socket.

    PAIN: Some discomfort is normal after surgery. To minimize pain take two Tylenol, Nuprin, Advil or similar non-aspirin pain reliever every 3 to 4 hours until bedtime to maintain comfort. Take it before the anesthesia wears off. If prescription pain medication is prescribed, take it as instructed on the label. Don't exceed the dose on the label. Taking with food or milk will help reduce upset stomach. Avoid driving or operating heavy machinery when taking pain prescriptions. Do not drink alcohol while taking prescription pain medications.

    NAUSEA: This is most often caused by taking pain medications on an empty stomach. Reduce nausea by preceding each pain pill with soft food and taking the pill with a large glass of water.

    SWELLING: Applying an ice bag to the face over the operated area will minimize swelling. Apply for 15 minutes, then remove for 15 minutes. Continue this for the first day.

    NUMBNESS: The local anesthetic will cause you to be numb for several hours after you leave the office. Be very careful not to bite, chew, pinch or scratch the numb area. Sometimes the extraction causes residual numbness or tingling for six weeks or longer.

    BRUSHING: Do not brush your teeth for the first 8 hours after surgery. After this, you may brush your teeth gently, but avoid the area of surgery for 3 days.

    RINSING: Avoid all rinsing or swishing for 24 hours after extraction. Rinsing can disturb the formation of a healing blood clot which is essential to proper healing. This could cause bleeding and risk of dry socket. After 24 hours you may begin gentle rinsing with a saltwater solution (1/2 teaspoon salt + 1/2 teaspoon soda + 8 ounces warm water). Avoid commercial mouthrinses.

    DIET: Eat soft foods for the first two days. Maintain a good, balanced diet. Return to normal regular meals as soon as you are able after the first two days. Drink plenty of water. Avoid alcohol for 48 hours.

    ACTIVITY: After leaving the office, rest and avoid strenuous activities for the remainder of the day. Keeping blood pressure lower will reduce bleeding and aid healing.

    ANTIBIOTICS: If you were given an antibiotic prescription, take all of them as directed until they are gone. Women: some antibiotics can reduce the effectiveness of birth control pills. Use alternate birth control methods for two months.

    SINUS: If your sinus was involved in the procedure, you should avoid blowing your nose or playing a wind musical instrument for one week. Use of decongestant medications might be recommended.

    FOLLOW-UP APPOINTMENTS: You may need to return to the office to have sutures removed or just for a brief follow-up healing check.

    Please call your dentist if you have:

    • Uncontrollable pain
    • Excessive or severe bleeding
    • Marked fever
    • Excessive warm swelling occurring a few days after the procedure
    • Reactions to medications, especially rash, itching, or breathing problems

    Following these instructions very closely will greatly help your comfort and promote uneventful healing of the area. If any of the instructions are not followed, you might have significantly more discomfort and the success of the procedure may be affected.

  • Pre-prosthetic procedures:

    Pre-prosthetic surgery refers to any procedure that alters your mouth to accommodate a denture or another prosthesis better. If you need pre-prosthetic surgery, your oral surgeon will most likely partner with your restorative dentist to form your treatment plan.

    Some patients will be able to receive dentures without any surgical procedures but when teeth are missing for an extended period, the bone beneath the gums can change shape. A properly fitting denture is crucial for your comfort and overall well-being and some patients require a minor procedure to ensure a secure fit.

    Types of Pre-Prosthetic Procedures

    When teeth are missing or extracted, the bone beneath the gums can change in shape or size making it difficult to place a denture. One or more soft or hard tissue adjustments may be necessary to ensure that your denture fits well. The following are some of the most common pre-prosthetic procedures:

    • Bone smoothing or reshaping
    • Ridge reduction
    • Removal of excess gum or soft tissue
    • Bone or tissue grafting
    • Extraction of teeth for denture placement

    We will evaluate your needs during a consultation appointment with your oral surgeon, at which you will have a chance to discuss your condition and goals with your doctor.

    Benefits of a Secure Denture:

    Making sure your dentures fit well can improve your overall quality of life. Some of the benefits of a good fit include Less slipping or movement while eating, speaking, etc.

    Fewer sores or less discomfort caused by a poor fit.

    Increased confidence level when smiling or eating.

    Easier chewing for certain foods.

    We will do everything possible to make your dentures feel comfortable and stable. If dentures simply aren’t the right choice for you, you can discuss other tooth replacement options with your oral surgeon. If you are considering alternatives to dentures, our surgeon are experts at dental implant procedures and full-arch restorations as well.

    Pre operative instructions :

    • You may not have anything to eat or drink (including water) for 8 hours prior to the appointment. For morning surgery, no food or liquids after midnight the night before surgery.
    • No smoking at least 12 hours before surgery. Ideally, cut down or stop smoking as soon as possible prior to the day of surgery.
    • A responsible adult must accompany the patient to the office, remain in the office during the procedure and drive the patient home.
    • Plan to rest for the remainder of the surgery day. The patient should not drive a vehicle or operate any machinery for 24 hours following the anesthesia experience.
    • Please wear loose-fitting clothing with sleeves that can be rolled up past the elbow and low-heeled shoes.
    • Contact lenses, jewelry and dentures must be removed at the time of surgery.
    • Do not wear lipstick, excessive makeup or nail polish on the day of surgery.
    • If you have an illness such as a cold, sore throat or stomach or bowel upset. Please notify the office.
    • If you take routine oral medications, please check with your doctor prior to your surgical date for instructions.
    • The use of alcohol or recreational drugs can have an adverse effect on the anesthesia medications that we use. Please discontinue the use of such for at least 72 hours prior to your procedure.
    • If you were prescribed medications by your doctor, please closely follow the instructions for their use.

    Post-operative Instructions:

    DO NOT DISTURB THE AREA: For the next few days and especially the first 24 hours, it is very important to allow your body to form a good clot and start the natural healing process. Swishing, sucking through a straw and smoking can all dislodge the clot. Keep anything sharp from entering the wound (crunchy food, toothpicks, eating utensils). Be sure to chew on the opposite side for 24 hours.

    BLEEDING: When you leave the office, you might be biting on a gauze pad to control bleeding. Keep slight pressure on this gauze for at least 30 minutes. Don't change it during this time; it needs to remain undisturbed while a clot forms in the extraction socket. After 30 minutes you may remove it. You may bite on another gauze or a tea bag for another 30 minutes if you feel it is still bleeding. Small amounts of blood in the saliva can make your saliva appear quite red. This is normal and may be noticed the rest of the day after the procedure.

    SMOKING: Smoking should be stopped following surgery. Healing and success of the surgery will be substantially reduced by the cigarette smoke chemicals in your body. Also the suction created when inhaling cigarettes can dislodge the clot. Smokers are at greater risk of developing a painful Dry Socket.

    PAIN: Some discomfort is normal after surgery. To minimize pain take two Tylenol, Nuprin, Advil or similar non-aspirin pain reliever every 3 to 4 hours until bedtime to maintain comfort. Take it before the anesthesia wears off. If prescription pain medication is prescribed, take it as instructed on the label. Don't exceed the dose on the label. Taking with food or milk will help reduce upset stomach. Avoid driving or operating heavy machinery when taking pain prescriptions. Do not drink alcohol while taking prescription pain medications.

    NAUSEA: This is most often caused by taking pain medications on an empty stomach. Reduce nausea by preceding each pain pill with soft food and taking the pill with a large glass of water.

    SWELLING: Applying an ice bag to the face over the operated area will minimize swelling. Apply for 15 minutes, then remove for 15 minutes. Continue this for the first day.

    NUMBNESS: The local anesthetic will cause you to be numb for several hours after you leave the office. Be very careful not to bite, chew, pinch or scratch the numb area. Sometimes the extraction causes residual numbness or tingling for six weeks or longer.

    BRUSHING: Do not brush your teeth for the first 8 hours after surgery. After this you may brush your teeth gently, but avoid the area of surgery for 3 days.

    RINSING: Avoid all rinsing or swishing for 24 hours after extraction. Rinsing can disturb the formation of a healing blood clot which is essential to proper healing. This could cause bleeding and risk of dry socket. After 24 hours you may begin gentle rinsing with a saltwater solution (1/2 teaspoon salt + 1/2 teaspoon soda + 8 ounces warm water). Avoid commercial mouthrinses.

    DIET: Eat soft foods for the first two days. Maintain a good, balanced diet. Return to normal regular meals as soon as you are able after the first two days. Drink plenty of water. Avoid alcohol for 48 hours.

    ACTIVITY: After leaving the office, rest and avoid strenuous activities for the remainder of the day. Keeping blood pressure lower will reduce bleeding and aid healing.

    ANTIBIOTICS: If you were given an antibiotic prescription, take all of them as directed until they are gone. Women: some antibiotics can reduce the effectiveness of birth control pills. Use alternate birth control methods for two months.

    SINUS: If your sinus was involved in the procedure, you should avoid blowing your nose or playing a wind musical instrument for one week. Use of decongestant medications might be recommended.

    FOLLOW-UP APPOINTMENTS: You may need to return to the office to have sutures removed or just for a brief follow-up healing check.

    Please call your dentist if you have:

    • Uncontrollable pain
    • Excessive or severe bleeding
    • Marked fever
    • Excessive warm swelling occurring a few days after the procedure
    • Reactions to medications, especially rash, itching, or breathing problems

    Following these instructions very closely will greatly help your comfort and promote uneventful healing of the area. If any of the instructions are not followed, you might have significantly more discomfort and the success of the procedure may be affected.

  • Facial Trauma

    Facial trauma refers to any injury to the face, teeth or inside of the mouth. Whether your trauma was the result of a sports injury, an accidental fall, or another incident, it’s important to seek treatment as soon as possible. Doing so can prevent future complications. If you experience a facial cut, broken tooth or fractured facial bone. Our staff will see you as soon as possible — usually the day you call. Oral surgeons undergo years of hospital-based training where they learn to repair facial injuries while preserving the appearance of your face.

    Treating Facial Injuries

    The face is one of the most complicated parts of the body: various muscles, glands, nerves and structures must work together in perfect harmony for a person to eat, speak and function normally. Oral surgeons are trained to restore both the function and the appearance of your face after an injury. Depending on the location and extent of your injury, one or more of the following methods may be used:

    Soft tissue injuries. With soft tissue injuries, such as facial lacerations or intraoral cuts, oral surgeons usually treat the injury with sutures. Our surgeons understand the need to prevent scarring, and they can use techniques that hide or minimize any visible scars once your injury heals.

    Bone injuries/fractures. Doctors treat broken bones by stabilizing the bone in its proper position. With most body parts, a cast is used to hold the bones in place, but it’s impossible (and impractical) to place a cast over the smaller facial bones (eye sockets, jaws, etc.,). Instead, oral surgeons surgically place tiny plates to secure your facial bones after an injury.

    Dental injuries. Sometimes your dentist can repair a broken or cracked tooth, but when an injury damages the tooth socket or knocks out a tooth, an oral surgeon may be necessary. Oral surgeons can often restore an avulsed tooth or repair a damaged tooth socket.

    If you lose an adult tooth, bring it into the office right away because the best chances of replacement are within the first 30 minutes after tooth loss. Make sure you don’t wipe off or clean the tooth, as doing so can damage tissues that are important for replacement. Just put the tooth in a container of saliva or whole milk and bring it in as quickly as possible.

    You will be sent home with an anti-inflammatory, antibiotic, and ear medication. It is important that you take the medications as instructed.

    For two to six weeks following surgery, you diet should consist of a soft diet as chewing may disrupt the joint and can cause problems. The diet does not need to be limited to liquids, but the consistency should be that of cottage cheese, pasta, egg salad and other soft foods that do not require heavy chewing.

    You should begin careful jaw exercises on the third day following your surgery. These are stretching exercises to reduce stiffness in the joint associated with the surgery. This should be performed at least ten times per day, repeated ten times daily for a minimum of ten days.

    Careful stretching and gentle range-of-motion exercises are very important in your recovery. You should open your jaw as wide as you can and hold it in place. The first week, you should be able to open enough to get two fingers in between your upper and lower teeth.

    By the second week after surgery, you should be opening wide enough to fit three fingers between your upper and lower teeth. This can be achieved by gentle stretching of the jaw with your fingers or by using the tongue blades you were given.

    It will be beneficial to schedule appointments with a physical therapist. The particular regimen for physical therapy will be discussed at your post-operative visit.

    If you wore a splint before your surgery, you may place the splint back in your mouth following surgery. You may continue to wear the splint as you had before the surgery.

    Avoid bending over, heavy lifting or activities that cause increased pressure in the head region.

Now Accepting New Patients

Follow